Browsed by
Tag: Aquatic plants

Propagating Cyperus alternifolius

Propagating Cyperus alternifolius

I had been growing Cyperus alternifolius some time ago. It’s a rewarding plant that can easily withstand drought, neglect and constant wet and boggy conditions. It’s not hardy enough to survive most of our winters outside, so I need to take it inside during the cold months. Last winter, I tried placing my Cyperus plants into deeper water to protect it from freezing. I doubt they froze, but none of them survived.

It only took 6 days for the cutting to start growing new shoots.
It only took 6 days for the cutting to start growing new shoots.
The other day, a couple of weeks ago, I found large Cyperus alternifolius plants and asked the owner if I can take one that was broken. Received friendly chit-chat and at least ten large Cyperus heads! I was told that these plants return every year even when temperatures in the winter fall slighly below freezing. Hopefully they will be easier to maintain during the winter around here as well. I placed all of them into large jar filled with water and waited. After only 6 days, first shoots already started emerging. I remember when I tried propagating my old Cyperus plants, that started to rot first and then if I was lucky enough, small shoots also poked out.

Sadly I also lost my Cyperus papyrus last winter. It refused to overwinter inside and froze to death outside. If I get my hands on it, I’ll keep it in a bit less humid soil during the winter, I’ve kept mine in water and it sadly turned to mush before the spring arrived.

What do you think of this post?
  • Interesting (3)
  • Useful (1)
  • Awesome (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Sucks (0)
Drosera capensis

Drosera capensis

After one of close encounters with fungus gnats and aphids, I thought about growing some kind of carnivore plants, that could make problems go away. Since carnivore plants also have issues with both, I would at least get some satisfaction, watching the pest being eaten by it’s prey. I decided I’ll try growing Drosera capensis, which is supposed to be one of the easiest carnivores to grow. Sadly it’s not cold hardy, so I’ll have to keep it inside – where the gnats are, but we actually have three varieties of Drosera growing locally. Perhaps I’ll plant those outside around the pond.

I used peat and living sphagnum moss, combined with SiO2 based sand. I was in a hurry, so I skipped flushing the soil mix with distilled water. Chopped living sphagnum particles were evenly distributed throughout the mix and I was hoping sphagnum moss would start growing on top of the soil.

Drosera capensis started germinating after 10 days
Drosera capensis started germinating after 10 days

Seeds that germinated were hard to notice because of the moss
Seeds that germinated were hard to notice because of the moss
First germination occurred around two weeks later. I was getting worried, because moss already started showing growth, ant it started sprouting all over the pot. I expected that I won’t be able to see the emerging seedlings as they start appearing. After 10 days I did see something green and after closer examination, it became clear that it in fact was small Drosera seedling. Drosera capensis seeds are incredibly small, so you need a camera or magnifying glass to see small seedlings. Since I haven’t wash the soil mix with distilled water before sowing, I later decided to try sowing into agar medium. Some of the seedlings disappeared during germination and whole top soil appeared to be slightly moving because of living moss which I added to peat/sand mix. Adding living moss ended as bad idea which I don’t intend to repeat.

 

Tiny seedling with first pair of  non-carnivorous (cotyledons) leaves.
Tiny seedling with first pair of non-carnivorous (cotyledons) leaves.

First carnivorous leaf emerged roughly a week after germination
First carnivorous leaf emerged roughly a week after germination
Despite a lot of effort to try and get as sharp photo of tiny seedlings as possible, pictures still look blurry. To snap tiny Drosera seedlings, you need macro lenses and tripod and I don’t have either. Interestingly, seedlings grow at different rates of growth. One of the seedlings that was the largest at first and received equal or even higher amount of light than other seedlings started to lag behind. It did start growing it’s second leaf earlier, but the first true leaf was smaller and it wasn’t carnivorous. When first seedling already started catching insects, with its one carnivorous leaf, whole bunch of new seedlings started to emerge.
 

It caught it's first prey the same day when first dew appeared
It caught it’s first prey the same day when first dew appeared
First Drosera dinner
Just a couple of hours after I first noticed carnivorous leaf started showing dew on it’s tentacles, I noticed black spot covering it’s leaf. I was thinking about feeding it, but as it’s leaves were still far too small, it would be mission impossible. At first I thought it might be covered with small part of soil particles, or part of the seed coat. I decided to re-check it and try to get sharp photo of the leaf, so I spent a couple of minutes watching the seedling through the camera’s lens. Not only I saw that in fact it caught it’s first insect, I also noticed there was another one wandering around the seedling as well. They looked like black tiny beetles. The one that was still alive was a little bit larger and very fast for such small insect. I used living moss to prepare the soil mix, which quite possibly hosted a lot of living organisms. Interestingly, Drosera capensis seedling managed to attract those beetles extremely fast.
When fed, its tentacles start producing more mucilage
When fed, its tentacles start producing more mucilage

Second carnivorous leaf
Second carnivorous leaf
Few days after first meal, it became clear that seedling which managed to capture an insect, started to grow faster and increased it’s mucilage production. I decided to feed it again, together with the second largest seedling. I found thrips (Thrips tabaci) on an onion and used a couple of nymphs to feed the seedlings. I used toothpick to transfer the nymphs onto carnivorous leaves. Two seedlings failed to grab the nymph off the toothpick, other two seedlings had enough dew to glue it onto their first leaf. Half an hour after feeding, tentacles started producing more mucilage and slowly started digesting their meal.

Drosera's hand reaching out from a dark pit
Drosera’s hand reaching out from a dark pit
First of the seedlings that germinated and appeared to grow fast, started to decline a bit before first carnivorous leaf formed. Leaf top became pale and it needed much more time to finally grow two small tentacles. It was a bit stunted and I hoped it’s not an issue that would harm the seedlings. Despite feeding, one of first two plants started to look strangely similar to the stunted seedling, it almost completely stopped growing. Growing leaf started to turn orange and I was happy to see that there were tentacles forming, but the formation was much slower than with it’s first leaf that appeared green. It also happened that the leaf on which the nymph was, got damaged one night. The nymph disappeared completely and there were like less than half tentacles left. One week after the feeding, the largest seedling also started growing orange leaf, but this time only “cap” was orange and it seemed to grow at normal speed. Apparently, when seeds germinate, they grow faster and are prone to coloration caused by intense light. Same thing happens after feeding, when plant starts to grow faster. When at one point plant get stressed by intense light, its growth slows down and it starts to adapt.

Whole bunch of black bugs got caught at the same time.
Whole bunch of black bugs got caught at the same time.
At one point two largest seedlings caught  a lot of black bugs at the same time. What caused it?
At one point two largest seedlings caught a lot of black bugs at the same time. What caused it?

At one point when nymph got digested completely the same seedling somehow attracted whole mass of tiny black bugs onto it’s second carnivorous trap. The same day I’ve notice another seedling with trap that also got lucky. Strange thing is, there were also other traps on smaller seedlings all around the pot, but they were the only ones that managed to capture anything and they both caught a lot. It’s certain, that the pot is full of these tiny black creatures crawling around and that they often end up being caught by seedlings. Perhaps other traps lacked dew or were simply not sticky enough to capture anything. I realized that using living moss wasn’t so bad idea after all. I inoculated the pot with abundance of living plant food. If they also ate mold and partly digested insect carcasses, small ecosystem was perfect.

Unimaginable luck or are these bugs gathering for some reason? I'd say luck is ruled out, it's just way too much. :)
Unimaginable luck or are these bugs gathering for some reason? I’d say luck is ruled out, it’s just way too much. đŸ™‚

One morning, I noticed there was whole pile of bugs on one tiny trap. That completely ruled out my thoughts that these bugs randomly roam around the pot and get caught when going over drosera’s traps. Well, actually, that is most likely true, but they tend to gather around their dead or captured siblings. Perhaps they were mating and the first one attracted whole group that also got caught. Another option that I can think of is, that they are carnivores and they eat dead insects. I lean forward to the ‘mating’ answer, because there were just too many in the same trap and I don’t think they can sense food that well. If I’d known what these black insects were I could do some research.

Another globular springtail bites the dust
Another globular springtail bites the dust
After a lot of research, I found out that springtails act exactly like these tiny black creatures. Females use pheromones to attract males, which explains why there are piles of bugs caught at the same time in the same trap when female gets caught and why there’s only one springtail caught when male gets trapped. I searched for various springtails and tried to identify the creatures. It became apparent that they are Globular Springtails. I don’t have equipment to close up and view more detailed photo of springtail, so I had to use my digital camera and close up as much as possible to get the best idea about its shape. My guess after internet research i did is, that these black springtails are in fact Sminthurinus niger globular springtails. They usually don’t do any damage to plats and feed on fungus, which can be beneficial in moist environment I grew carnivore plants in.

1 month old seedlings under strong LED lights
1 month old seedlings under strong LED lights

One month after germination, seedlings looked more and more sickly, some of them lost dew and it became evident that with time all the seedlings started to show signs of stress. New leaves did not grow completely and some of the leaves even turn light brown and died. I figured out that light level plays no role in their decline, the real reason was the soil. Seeds that were planted in pure peat were all growing into healthy green seedlings with a lot of dew. At that point, I decided to transplant all remaining seedlings into another pot. A couple of seedlings were already too damaged to survive the transplant, but many had shown some improvement. I covered the pot again to increase humidity and to make sure the dew appeared again. The largest seedling started to decline before it got transplanted and it’s two leaves that were already growing for some time failed to grow tentacles. They were stunted and damaged, but in the middle of the seedling new leaves started turning from pink to green in just a couple of days.

Drosera swiftly recovered. Dew appeared again and new leaves had fully developed working tentacles.
Drosera swiftly recovered. Dew appeared again and new leaves had fully developed working tentacles.
Two months old seedling. This one really took off. Other seedlings are also growing but at much, much slower pace.
Two months old seedling. This one really took off. Other seedlings are also growing but at much, much slower pace.
When Drosera capensis start growing large enough leaves, it gets easier to feed. Small ants and flies are its natural diet. A week after feeding, growth always speeds up. Sadly other seedlings don't show the same kind of vigor.
When Drosera capensis start growing large enough leaves, it gets easier to feed. Small ants and flies are its natural diet. A week after feeding, growth always speeds up. Sadly other seedlings don’t show the same kind of vigor.
Drosera capensis flower. Flowers only last a few hours, but when they start, they set new flowers for quite some time.
Drosera capensis flower. Flowers only last a few hours, but when they start, they set new flowers for quite some time.
One of the leaves with it's prey.
One of the leaves with it’s prey.
Flower stalk uprising
Flower stalk uprising

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

That's how it looks 8 months after it germinated. Each seedling is starting it's second flower stalk.
That’s how it looks 8 months after it germinated. Each seedling is starting it’s second flower stalk.

I’ve been somewhat worried about huge amount of sunlight they received during the summer and because of heat that exceeded 35°C for quite a while. I noticed they not only survive in those conditions, but actually love it. They loved occasional flooding in the hottest weather and also didn’t mind when peat got a bit drier. I’ve learnt that Drosera capensis is quite tough and the only thing it did harm it (a bit), was rain. They don’t seem to like getting wet.

 
 
 

What do you think of this post?
  • Awesome (12)
  • Interesting (4)
  • Useful (1)
  • Boring (0)
  • Sucks (0)
Houttuynia cordata ‘Chameleon’

Houttuynia cordata ‘Chameleon’

Flowering Chameleon plant
Flowering Chameleon plant
Striking colors of Houttuynia cordata ‘Chameleon’
Striking colors of Houttuynia cordata ‘Chameleon’

Houttuynia cordata should come with a warning, according to many gardeners that allowed it to grow freely around the garden. It produces underground rhizomes that “travel” into all directions, creating dense groundcover. In time it can loose it’s colorful variegation and turn back into less attractive mostly green variety.

Very aggressive photo. Literally!
Very aggressive photo. Literally!

The plant just loves water. It thrives in moist or even wet soil, with roots occasionally submerged in water. It’s a bit slower in dry conditions, but it tolerates drought as well. Its colors look best in full sun, but it doesn’t mind growing in complete shade as well.

The plant have very strong smell that resembles smell of fish. Plants are edible and were used as herbs in Chinese medicine.

What do you think of this post?
  • Useful (1)
  • Interesting (1)
  • Awesome (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Sucks (0)
Cold

Cold

Cold weather ends the growing season sooner or later, this year it was rather soon. With no snow insulation, cold can induce more damage that with thick layer of snow insulation. This year, despite all the cold, we are yet to see the first snow.

Hard frosts had made Borinda fungosa suffer.
Hard frosts had made Borinda fungosa suffer.

Borinda fungosa seedling was holding on very well down to -5°C. Soon night temperature dropped down to -7°C and many of the leaves got damaged. Leaves that remained undamaged, surprisingly remained unfolded even during sunny and windy weather. It did loose all the shoots from this autumn, as it did last winter, but this time, some of them remained tall, only loosing their fragile top. Perhaps in the spring, they will begin the branching process. Cold weather persisted for around two weeks, daily highs were slightly above or below freezing, it was sunny and windy most of the time. Morning low temperatures were between -5°C and -8°C. This is it’s second winter outside, I’ll see how it resists cold. Last year when it was covered in thick layer of snow most of the winter, it managed to keep most of the leaves intact.fungosa winter damage
fungosa damaged by cold Well, the problem with all that snow insulation was weight. Heavy wet snow broke all the taller culms and only a couple of old tiny ones remained. Dead shoots that grew in late fall were not all dead, one of them managed to grow branches around the lowest node, that was buried under thick layer of mulch.
After almost a month of very cold weather, with fog persisting through most of the day, with day temperature slightly below freezing, leafs managed to unfold, showing the damage. It looks like most, if not all, leaves were completely killed or badly damaged. Culms and branches are showing their dark brown color and they seem to be alive even after prolonged period of cold weather. Hopefully in 4 months we’ll get some warm weather for it to recover.

 

Shiroshima with it's beautiful  varieagated leaves remains almost intact.
Shiroshima with it’s beautiful varieagated leaves remains almost intact.
Hibanobambusa tranquilans ‘Shiroshima’ is looking hardy enough to survive this kind of cold dry weather without hassle. There’s no evident damage, not even on several late fall whip shoots. Whips stopped growing with arrival of cold weather, lower nodes actually hardened enough to drop off culm sheathes, while their tops remained fresh and stopped growing completely. I guess we’ll have to wait and see if they resume in the spring. With temperatures close to freezing, white variegation on the leaves turned into bright yellow color, making bamboo look even better.

 
 

Moso seedling that remained inside the pot is showing quite some damage.
Moso seedling that remained inside the pot is showing quite some damage.

Phyllostachys pubescens ‘Moso’ seedling that escaped it’s pot is showing moderate leaf damage. It’s evident, that there’s almost no damage on the escaped part of bamboo that ran out of the pot two seasons ago. Leaves that were pale during the summer and showed some kind of stress, wilted after first heavy frost. Dark green leaves mostly remained undamaged, but they do tend to wilt when exposed
Moso seedling shows some damage, but it looks quite good.
Moso seedling shows some damage, but it looks quite good.
to sun. Wilting is normal, because soil already got frozen on top and bamboo have to save water inside it’s leaves.
The part that escaped managed to put out numerous runners and a couple of shoots that barely poked out through the mulch. They are most likely whip shoots that missed their growing season. So far they haven’t got soft and are most likely alive, waiting to resume in the spring. Last year, pot ended up as home of mice family that stayed there throughout the winter. They didn’t do much damage, but there were holes all around the pot and I’m sure there was some root damage. Well, better mice than voles! They can devastate whole bamboo clumps.
 
 
Umbrella palm seedlings, planted around the garden and inside the pond didn’t take the cold well. First hard frost killed everything above the soil/water level, and most likely, rhizomes as well. We’ll see if it restarts in the spring, if not, I still have one large seedling kept safely inside.
At first dark green damaged leaves turned into straw color. They’ve kept their appearance as they would still be alive. Dry clumps of umbrella papyrus are looking quite good. I’m going to keep them for a while, if rain or snow doesn’t make them look ugly that is.
Cyperus alternifolius that remained inside the pond got frozen. It's not ugly just yet, though.
Cyperus alternifolius that remained inside the pond got frozen. It’s not ugly just yet, though.

It changed color from dark green to straw yellow. I'm keeping those bushes, because they look quite fascinating.
It changed color from dark green to straw yellow. I’m keeping those bushes, because they look quite fascinating.
What do you think of this post?
  • Useful (2)
  • Awesome (0)
  • Interesting (0)
  • Boring (0)
  • Sucks (0)